Review: In Search of and Others, by Will Ludwigsen

4* (our of 5) for “In Search Of”. It’s a weird format–a list of facts about your life that you didn’t know. But in telling you these things, Ludwigsen tells you who you are–a man who became a cop, who wasn’t everything he wanted to be but wasn’t nothing, who lost more than he thought and didn’t hold on to the woman who loved him the most. The kicker at the end makes it all worthwhile.

4* for “Endless Encore”. What looks like a simple ghost story becomes more with the addition of tangible details; you stop thinking of it as a story written on a page. The color of a dress, the time of day, the wood and stone and the dialogue of a jealous preteen, all blend together into a real moment.

5* for “The Speed of Dreams”. Once again, Ludwigsen presents you with one story and then kicks you in the teeth at the end with the other story he’s been telling all along. You’re watching it move along and take this twist and then you’re thinking, “No, no, don’t go that way…” but it does. I was left at the end wanting to tell her not to do it, but by the time we’re reading it, it’s too late. Continue reading

New Review of WOMEN AND OTHER CONSTRUCTS (plus links & giveaway)

There is a great new review of my short fiction collection, Women and Other Constructs! At SF Signal, Carl V. Anderson gave it 4.5 out of 5 stars, saying:

Women and Other Constructs is a varied, powerful collection of stories that showcases the range and talent of an author who will hopefully continue to rise in exposure in the SFF community.  Her work demonstrates that the short fiction format, particularly in SF/F/H can be a vessel that contains effective plotting, strong characterization, and worthwhile examination of important topics while still being highly entertaining.  This collection is not light, by any means, conversely it is not heavy to the point of getting in the way of good storytelling.  The stories Carrie Cuinn includes in this volume show that “thought-provoking” need not mean “inaccessible” to the average reader.”

Read the rest of the (very long, detailed, and glowing) review here: SF Signal

Plus, Anderson is giving away a copy of the book at his website. Comment there to be entered.

Please click through to my online shop to buy DRM-free ebooks of this book, directly from me. PDF, ePub (suitable for your nook, tablets, and more) and Mobi (for Kindle) versions are available for instant download, so you can read it across any of your devices, or on your computer.  You can also order signed copies of the print book!

Bundle of signed print book + instant download of all ebook formats $12.99, or just the signed book, $10

Bundle of all ebook formats $2.99, or individually: ePub, Mobi, or PDF, just $1.99

CLICK HERE TO BUY MY BOOKS

Also available via Amazon: Kindle ($1.99) and print ($5.99)

Oh, did you see the interview I did with AC Wise? You can find out more about the collection here. Thanks for reading!

womenprintcoverSMALL

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Review: Nature “Futures” April, May, June 2013

Nature magazine publishes flash science fiction under the collective title “Futures“. They accept unagented submissions, pay a pro rate, and have an interesting target word count: 850-950 firm. Overall, I was less impressed than I expected. There were stories that seemed to be badly told copies of common tales we’ve heard a hundred times before.  I thought there’d be a lot more working science, too. But there were also brilliant pieces that are absolutely worth reading. (My favorites were by Lin, Liu, Spruck Wrigley, Stanger, Shvartsman, Starks, and Powers-Smith.)

June 2013

Probability-1: termination” by Euan Nisbet. (Alt history. Scientists plan to change a single molecule in the fertilized eggs that would become King George and Queen Victoria, in order to save America from worldwide sanctions.) The story seemed based too much on name dropping the alt-world’s leaders, and relied too little on plot. Plus, a scientist has a workable machine that can change molecules anywhere in time, paid for by government funding, and yet has free range to use the machine without any supervision? 2/5

Buzz off” by John Grant. (Aliens arrive to help humans become civilized, are surprised to find we won’t listen.) Straight-forward, common tropes. Relies on a joke reveal at the end. 2/5

Mortar flowers” by Jessica May Lin. (Artist in a war zone making beauty out of desolation.) Lovely. The backstory is subtle but clear, the mood sombre with the memory of lost hope, and using the scientific names for flowers–instead of a description of what they look like–works perfectly. It’s a moment with a history, a beginning, and a believable end. 5/5

Continue reading

Free Fiction: “Notes On My Recent Job Interview With Your Firm”

Excerpt:

Dear Nancy from HR,

I am writing to reply to the survey I found attached to the letter informing me that, “we have determined that other applicants’ skills and experience more closely meet our company’s needs”. I realize your letter was mailed several weeks ago, but I was unavoidably detained during that time, and was unable to respond earlier. I have been advised that answering the questions in depth may relieve some lingering feelings of unease I have been experiencing since my interview. Please bear with me, as your form has limited space for additional notes. Some answers continue on the back.

1. How clear was the information you were given before the interview?

C. Moderately clear

After a pleasant phone call asking me to appear for an interview with your firm, I was emailed an itinerary which included the names of staff members I would be meeting, as well as a schedule of events. While I admit that a few of the items seemed strange, I assumed this was your department’s attempt at job-related humor. In hindsight, the schedule was extremely accurate, and I accept the blame for not realizing “enter Applicant Tracking System” meant I’d be injected with a radioactive tracer. (The bruise has mostly faded.)

Download a PDF of the whole story here!

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UPDATED List: 150+ Asian Speculative Fiction Authors (with links)

Updated to add suggestions from the comments/email/Twitter. All authors mentioned prior to 7/9/2017 are now included. If you’re not on this list but should be, or you’re on it but want me to link to a more recent story or current website, please comment below.

I’ve been wanting to expand my reading to include more international speculative fiction, and more non-white American authors. I am privileged to know a couple of brilliant writers who also happen to be Asian, and that seemed a good place to start my reading*. I put together a list of work I’d been meaning to explore, and then solicited ideas from Twitter and the SFWA forums. Most people suggested the same couple of names over and over again… while it’s, honestly, wonderful that we’ve reached a point in SF/F where these authors are being read and discussed at all, there’s so much more diversity in our fiction, if we just look for it. There’s almostover a hundred and fifty published writers on this list, and I know it isn’t everyone.

The authors are listed alphabetically by given name, so the list doesn’t imply hierarchy. I also didn’t sort by ancestry, current geographic location, or place of birth (though I noted it where it’s listed in author bios**), because the writers listed here have placed varying degrees of importance on those facts. Some work in American tropes, subverting the “classic” science fiction of the 50s, while others retell the myths of their homeland in new and unique ways. Some look to the future, extrapolating possibilities from their own experiences. There’s no one style, structure, or emotional context that can be called “Asian writing”. What these authors have in common is that they’re all of Asian descent, and they all write speculative fiction***. These authors write primarily in English—I’ve included a few translated works, but I can’t vouch for the authenticity of voice, so I tried to choose English-language stories wherever possible.

I want to thank Clarkesworld, Apex Magazine, Crossed Genres Magazine, Lightspeed Magazine, Strange Horizons, Giganotosaurus, The World SF Blog, and Daily Science Fiction for repeatedly publishing these authors. Looking for diversity in short speculative fiction? Look to those publications. (Or my own, Lakeside Circus.) When I could find it, I’ve linked to the author’s Twitter, website, blog, list of publications, and/or a sample short story. I’ve also noted if the author works primarily in YA or MG fiction.

  1. Aditya Bidikar (Indian, shorts) story: “You Cannot Fight the WarWorld SF blog
  2. Alec Austin (Chinese-American, shorts) twitter website story: “Brief Interviews with TherianthropesDaily Science Fiction
  3. Alice Sola Kim (shorts) website publications story: “Hwang’s Brilliant DaughtersLightspeed
  4. Alliete de Bodard (French/Vietnamese, shorts stories/novels, Nebula and BFSA winner) twitter website publications story: “The Weight of a Blessing” Clarkesworld
  5. Alexander Osias (Filipino, shorts) G+ twitter
  6. Apol Lejano-Massebieau (Filipino, shorts) story: “The Sewing Project” Best of Philippine Speculative Fiction 2009
  7. Amish Tripathi (Indian, novels) twitter
  8. Amitav Ghosh (Indian, novels, Arthur C. Clark award, Man Booker shortlist) website publications blog
  9. Andrea G. Stewart (Chinese-American, shorts/novels) website Twitter
  10. Andrew Drilon (Filipino, shorts/comics/editing) blog
  11. Andrew Fukuda (Chinese/Japanese, novels) (YA) twitter website blog
  12. Andrew Vu website twitter facebook
  13. Anil Menon (Indian, shorts/novels/editing) website blog story: “ArchipelagoStrange Horizons
  14. Ashok Banker (Indian, novels) wikipedia
  15. Benjanun “Bee” Sriduangkaew (shorts) twitter blog story: “AnnexClarkesworld
  16. Berit Ellingsen (shorts, novel) website
  17. Brenda “B.W.” Clough (shorts/novels, Hugo and Nebula nominee) website publications
  18. Bryan Thao Worra (Laotian-American, shorts/poems) twitter blog poem: “No Such PhiLakeside Circus
  19. Budjette Tan (Filipino, comics/shorts, Philippine National Book Award winner) twitter blog story: “The Last Full ShowAlternative Alamat
  20. Camsy Ocumen (Filipino, shorts) story: “The Day the World Lost Its Gravity” Best of Philippine Speculative Fiction 2009
  21. Cassandra Khaw website
  22. Cecelia Manguerra Brainard (Filipino-American, novels/shorts/editing) website wiki
  23. Cecilia Tan (novelist, editing, shorts ) twitter website publications free fiction (sample chapters/serials)
  24. Celestine Trinidad (Filipino, shorts) story: “Under a Mound of Earth, part 1Philippine Genre Stories
  25. Charles Tan (Filipino, shorts/editing) twitter blog publications story: “The Fortunes of Mrs. Yu” The Dragon and the Stars”
  26. Charles Yu (shorts/novels, John W. Campbell nominee) twitter
  27. Chitra Divakaruni (Indian-American, shorts/novels/poems, Pushcart prize) website blog
  28. Cindy Pon (Taiwanese, novels) (YA) twitter website blog sample: first 70 pages of Silver Phoenix
  29. Claire Light (Chinese, shorts) website blog publications story: “The Apocalypse ArtistStretcher
  30. Crystal Koo (shorts, lectures) website twitter publications story: “HeartlandAbyss & Apex
  31. Dean Francis Alfar (Filipino, shorts/novels/plays/editing) twitter wiki story: “The New Daughter” Philippine Genre Stories”
  32. Derwin Mak (Chinese-Canadian, shorts/novels/editing Aurora award) twitter website publications blog novella: “Kleinheimat
  33. Dinesh Rao (Indian, shorts) blog story: “The Portal PlagueThe World SF Blog
  34. Don Pizarro (Filipino-American, shorts/editing) twitter website publications story: “Life After Wartime” Lakeside Circus
  35. Dwight Okita (novels) website
  36. Dung Kai-Cheung (Chinese, novels/plays) bio Continue reading