Patreon Update: 5 poems in 5 months, and more

Since starting my Patreon page in November 2015, I have consistently posted new content each month. I work better on a deadline, with structure, and this ongoing project gives me both of those things. To date, I’ve shared:

  1. 5 complete poems
  2. 4 excerpts from short stories in progress
  3. assorted other notes for my patrons

Three of the story excerpts are science fiction (two are definitely “hard sf”; the other is more subtle). One is modern fantasy, bordering on magic realism. All of the excerpts are several paragraphs long.

One poem is about witches, one is about a goddess. Two are science fiction. One has robots, one is set in space. Four have a loose style; one is a sonnet. The sonnet, at 14 lines, is the shortest one.

In all, not bad for 5 months of work.

I’m currently only at the first patron tier – but in another $20 a month, I’ll switch from poetry to posting complete flash fiction each month. Only subscribers to my Patreon get to see this work right now, and the other things I share in addition to the monthly original fiction. If I can get more supporters, to allow me to spend more time creating this work, I’ll keep adding more of the “extra bits”: more notes, and at least one excerpt from a wip each month.

My subscribers are only charged once per month, no matter how much I share, so whatever you commit to is all you’ll have to pay. Since your support gives me an opportunity to make a little extra money while I’m in college, it also frees me up to do a little more work for everyone – like the mini movie reviews I’ve started posting once a week.

So if you can, and you want to see writing from me that’s not yet available anywhere else, please go to my Patreon page and throw a few bucks my way. I appreciate it.

Mini Review: “The Search for General Tso” (2014)

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If you live in America, you probably know about General’s Chicken, that breaded and fried chicken dish, coated in a spicy-sweet sauce, available at almost every Chinese food restaurant. Ian Cheney directed this search for the truth behind the ubiquitous meal, which starts out with a few theories before examining the history leading up to the proliferation of the dish, and how it has changed over the years.

Along the way, Cheney explores the advent of Chinese food for sale in the United States. General’s Chicken, which is known by several similar names all over the world, is a hugely popular dish, and the documentary looks at its importance as a “way in” for Asian-Americans, interviewing restaurant owners and chefs, who talk about the racism they found in the new communities they moved into, and the acceptance that food brought to the table.

In the end, they do discover the original dish, and its creator, but like other appropriations – anyone familiar with McDonald’s chicken nuggets in sweet & sour sauce will recognize the similarities, discussed in the movie – that first version was “borrowed” and revised, too. In the end, I was a little sad, a lot more informed, and (if I’m being honest), hungry.

4/5*

Available on Netflix and Amazon.

On a related note, has anyone read Jennifer 8. Lee’s The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food? If not, I recommend it!

Mini Review: “World of Tomorrow” (2015)

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World of Tomorrow is only 16 minutes long. It’s been nominated for an Oscar, won more than 40 film festival awards, including the Grand Jury Prize for Short Film at Sundance Film Festival, and Best Animated Short at SXSW. I’d be surprised if it’s not at least nominated for some of our genre awards (I put it on my Hugo list, for example). Created entirely by Don Hertzfeld, it takes science fiction staples – cloning, time travel, space travel, singularity, robots, and aliens – as fact, and then uses that backdrop to tell a dark but loving story focused entirely on humanity. The shiny scifi bits exist but don’t matter nearly as much as one woman talking to one little girl about everything that gave her life meaning.

The animation has been called “avant-garde”, but though I liked it, it didn’t seem that far out of the realm of what’s been done before. It suits the story, which matters; the voice actors are also perfect, and in fact, Hertzfeld recorded his four-year-old niece while she was playing, and then edited her into the film as the main character’s younger self.

World of Tomorrow is excellent storytelling, and is a spot-on example of how I like my fiction: character-driven, a little bleak, a little frightening, fully aware of our own mortality, but hopeful, too. What is it to be alive? What makes you, you? Hope isn’t granted without working for it, and love isn’t free,  but if you live every day the best that you can, at the end, you’ll have had a full life.

5/5*

Watch it on Netflix or Vimeo.

 

Mini Review: “The Barkley Marathons” (2015)

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“If you’re selected, you get a letter of condolences: sorry to inform you, you’ve been selected to run the Barkley.” – THE BARKLEY MARATHONS: THE RACE THAT EATS ITS YOUNG

So begins a fascinating documentary on a race you’ve probably never heard of: a trail run so difficult that so far, only 14 people have actually finished it. Over 100 miles, in 5 loops, with 54,200 feet (16,500 m) of accumulated vertical climb, no aid stations, no GPS allowed, and a map you’re only allowed to see before you head out. To prove you ran the route correctly, you have to find paperback books scattered along the trail, and bring back pages that correspond to your race number. The entry fee is $1.60, a license plate from your home state or country, and what the race organizer needs that year: white socks, flannel shirts.

That’s not the weirdest part.

The course changes a little each year, and as one contestant said, to understand the directions you need to know the history of Cantrell’s directions for previous races. More than 30 people have given up before they even reached the end of the first two miles.

Co-Creator Gary Cantrell founded it after hearing about James Earl Ray’s prison break, but not as an homage to Ray; he heard Ray only got 8 miles after being in the woods for 55 hours, and thought he could do better. Each year, dozens of the world’s top ultramarathoners gather to prove themselves better than Ray too – to officially complete the race, all 100+ miles have to be finished in less than 60 hours.

It gets weirder, still.

You have to write an essay to even be considered.

I don’t want to give away all of the movie’s secrets, but it’s certainly worth watching, especially for fans of running, extreme sports, the depths of personal willpower, and anyone who’s ever planning to write a story in which a character has to escape through tough terrain. It made me feel like a slacker for not even trying to add a little running to my regular walking routine, so I’m doing that now – but on the other hand, since I’ve watched it, I feel like a hero whenever I get more than 2 miles.

I at least have the power to do that.

4/5*

Available on Netflix

Mini Review: “Twinsters” (2015)

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What if your identical twin sister sent you a Facebook message, and until then, you hadn’t known she existed? This is the story of two young women who met online. And a story of adoption. And a story of South Korea.

What started out as a cute story told with tweets, Skype, and emoji, turns into the exploration of two girls raised differently but with such complete love that finding another one of them was universally met with joy from their families and friends. I can’t imagine being so loved that if your parents found a second one of you, they would be thrilled, and welcome your twin as a second child, but this movie makes you happy for these adorable women, who literally traveled the world to find each other.

With the joy, comes the bittersweet. Not only do we see the impossible ways these two, raised on different continents, are alike, we also see how they’re not, contrasting the twin with adopted siblings – who grew up gregarious and brave – against the one who grew up feeling isolated, her whole life, even with all the love and opportunity her parents gave her. Her hesitation, her slow blossoming, into someone who maybe, sort of, might be ready to accept she isn’t alone after all.

Finally, South Korea. The movie ends with a chance to go “home” again, and unanswered questions, and the feeling of being a part of something larger than even together they had ever imagined. It’s a perfectly wistful note to close out the film.

Recommended for anyone who wants more empathy, more understanding, of what it’s like to be a sister, an only child, an adoptee, a person of color with white parents, unwanted, adored, lost, and found.

5/5*

Available on  Netflix