Book Review: Dial M for Monkey

3 of 5*

Only 60+ pages; this quick read can be started and finished in well under an hour, and that alone makes it not a waste of time. The stories are a mix of “high impact” and “needs an editor” – I kept wanting to revise or strike his last lines, over and over.

Maxwell sticks to a format of “Here’s the story, wait, no there’s a twist coming up, TWIST”, expanding it sometimes to “Here’s the story, wait, no there’s a twist coming up, wait for it, wait for it, really I mean it, keep waiting, TWIST, he he he” for most of the collection. Most of the characters are middle-aged, blue collar, London-area blokes, and a lot of the humor is crude (“He got hit in the balls with a block, lol” type of stuff.)

Probably the best are “I Almost Spanked A Monkey”, “Sprouts” (which is one of the few near-genre stories in the book), and “Is That To Go?”. All use Maxwell’s preferred format successfully, and none go on too long.

The longer pieces aren’t quite as good as the flash, IMO, but at the same time Maxwell brings in an earthy, working class, feel to his fiction that I don’t often see in lit flash. It’s an important perspective because it’s not often published, and some of the pieces do work very well. Don’t read it because it’s the best ever (it’s not) but it is a valuable use of an hour, even if you’re only learning what not to do yourself.

A Few Thoughts On Reviewing Books

I review, on average, 3 books or magazines a month. I talk about what didn’t work for me but mainly I talk about what did, because my goal is to share something that I think you should be reading.* If I read something, and I don’t like it at least enough to suggest you might get something out of it as well, I don’t review it at all.

Why not? Because I’m not a book reviewer.

There’s nothing wrong with being a reviewer, someone who reads a lot of books and shares their opinions with an audience. Depending on who it is, they’re going to be looking for different things in a story, but the overall goal is to take in a lot of reading and produce an opinion about what is good and what isn’t. Their reviews are incredibly useful for people looking to read a new author or a new book, and hoping for recommendations.

As an author and publisher, I love book reviewers who are dedicated solely to this task.  A good reviewer can convince you to read something just as much as they can turn you off of it, and (most importantly) doesn’t just recommend everything they read. Their followers can trust that when the reviewer says they liked an author’s work, they genuinely did. If that reviewer like your book, chances are good their audience will too. That’s new readers for me, increased sales, and the satisfaction of knowing that someone else got what we were trying to do.

But for me, reviewing is a byproduct of reading critically, not the goal. I read because I am a writer, first and foremost, and reading teaches me. I learn more about what I like, what I want a story or sentence to sound like, what feels smart or emotionally true or creative. I learn just as much from what I don’t enjoy, because over time you start to recognize patterns in the things that turn you off and then you can learn to avoid those things in your own work.

Even when a book is awful, I learn something.**

When I share my thoughts on a book, it’s because I want to support an author, magazine, or publisher that shared a great story with me. It’s also because most of the people who read this blog are also writers, and if I learned something cool, I want to share that with you too. Lastly, I review books because if I can get you to read something that I loved, or even liked, there’s a better chance that magazine or that author will create someone new in the future, and then I’ll get to read that too.

As far as I’m concerned, my discussions of what I like and don’t like are the same as when a group of us writers sits in a bar at a convention, talking about whose work has made an impression on us since the last con. (Yes, we do that.) I’m talking to you as part of my peer group. Here, come and take a peek at the conversation being had by people who are involved in making books. You’ll see it’s exactly the same as the ones readers have all of the time, too.

Authors should always be readers anyway.

So if you recommend a book to me (or send it to me, or you know that I bought it) and I don’t review it, it means that either I haven’t gotten to it yet (but plan to, if I can find the time) or that I didn’t have anything good to say about it. It could be either one, and you shouldn’t assume that you know which it is. Most of all, don’t ask me to tell you which books I hated this year, or why I didn’t like something. For the most part I can see when a book is well written, but just doesn’t appeal to me. I know my tastes aren’t the same as everyone else’s, and I’m not going to turn you away from a book you may love just because I couldn’t get through it. (I will say, if asked directly, that I wouldn’t recommend a book, because I won’t tell you to read a book I couldn’t get through either.)

When I review a work that fits within the kind of literature I talk about here, I’ll post that review to this site. If I read something that I enjoyed quite a lot, and is very entertaining, but doesn’t teach me anything, I usually post that review other places (like Functional Nerds or SF Signal). Those books are still great, but there’s a difference between “wow that’s brilliant, I should write like that” and “wow that was crazy fun I’m so glad I spent my evening reading that”.

Any questions?

* Most of my reviews are labeled Books I Recommend or You Should Read for that reason.
** Mostly, “Do not try this at home,” but hey, that’s learning.