Mythos Collection Fundraiser Update: Podcasts!

GoFundMe Page Here

I’ve raised almost 1/3 of my goal, but still need $1100 to pay off my two college classes. In addition to the collection of Lovecraft-inspired fiction I’m offering up in exchange, I’ve also got reward levels for backers: beta read for short fiction, original art, even a chance to name a body in one of these stories.

Now I’ve added another perk, and everyone who’s contributed $5 or more gets it! I’ll be recording me reading at least one story from the collection – the closer we get to the goal, the more I’ll commit to doing. If we meet the entire goal of $1500, through GoFundMe or through PayPal donations (which I’ve been adding to the GFM page so everyone can see the total raised), I’ll read the entire set of stories.

You can contribute at higher levels to get those rewards and still get the podcasts, too. It’s my gift to everyone who so generously gave to me.

As I said in my original post, you can contribute because I’m a good person going through a hard time. You can contribute because you like my writing and want to see more of it. You can contribute because you haven’t had to roll a SAN check recently. No matter why you lend a hand, I appreciate you.

Thank you.

Carrie Cuinn

PS. If you’d rather contribute by PayPal, which doesn’t charge as much as GoFundMe, you can send money using this link . If you do, I’ll add it manually here, so the total amount needed goes down.

Reviews of my Mythos fiction – get more in my new collection!

I’m funding a new mini-collection of Mythos fiction, and paying for a couple of college classes. Please go to my fundraising page for more info, including rewards. I’ve got deadlines, so this won’t be open long.

If you haven’t read my work before, I’ve collected some reviews of the two previously-printed stories that will appear in the collection…

Reviews of “No Hand to Turn the Key”, in Chaosium’s STEAMPUNK CTHULHU

No Hand to Turn the Key by Carrie Cuinn tells the tale of an alternate future where humanity has been wiped out by Mythos horrors leaving only automatons behind to defend what remains of Earth’s human legacy. The result is a touching tale of sacrifice and hope in the face of overwhelming odds. – Alan Loewen

Imagine if just the clockwork servitors of our own creation was all that was left. Humanity is gone and only they are there to try and preserve the knowledge that might save themselves, and might have damned humanity. [This story is] absolutely fantastic. – Amazon

Among the standout stories for me was Carrie Cuinn’s “No Hand To Turn the Key”. – David, Goodreads

Reviews of “CL3ANS3”, in Chaosium’s ELDRITCH CHROME

“CL3ANS3” is a beautiful story from Carrie Cuinn. Ms. Cuinn’s voice and the picture she was able to weave inside my mind was absolutely amazing, her prose was top-notch. – Brian Murphy (MU Podcast)

“CL3ANS3” by Carrie Cuinn: This story has a really cool concept about a future where all data has to be organized and that organization is done through a kind of virtual reality (it is cyberpunk after all). Carrie Cuinn does a great job of building a great world of CHARACTERS here, like Orson Scott Card did in Ender’s Game (yeah, the guy’s politics suck but he can write some amazing characters). I bring up ‘Ender’ because there are scenes in the story where the protagonist sits down and interacts with other ‘sorters’ in a kind of cafeteria and it just has this realistic feeling to it. The writing is very solid and when the virtual world starts to become tainted by Eldritch happenings the story delivers. – D. Anderson

The anthology had been described to me as ‘Cyberpunk Cthulhu’, which threw me off originally, until I sneaked a peek at Carrie Cuinn’s CL3ANS3, which is, in my opinion, the pivotal point in this anthology and its biggest sell. – Konstantine Paradias

Paradias wrote a full review elsewhere online, which says in part:

CL3ANS3 took me by surprise. Primarily, because this is one of those stories that make excellent material for experimental animation short films that have this rarely-seen alienating feeling to them. The world outlined by Carrie Cuinn in this short story is clinical, sterilized and strange beyond belief. Its main character might be an antisocial, objective narrator but the rest of the people occupying the setting aren’t all that better off.

This story forced me to do a double-take to pinpoint exactly what bothered me about it so much and guess what: it’s not the Lovecraftian Horrors, not in and of themselves. I think that this was perhaps the point that Cuinn was trying to make: the scary, strange future that waits just around the corner, its people distant and antisocial, scared more of each other than the things lurking just beyond the world.

Read the rest of his review here.

WILL WRITE MYTHOS FOR SCHOOL (Buy my new fiction, help me pay for college!)

Pre-order my new Mythos mini-collection through GoFundMe

Some of you know that the last few years, life has been extra difficult. I’ve had a bad landlord, a car crash, medical problems, lost my day job… with each new issue, I’ve struggled to keep my bills paid and care for my son, who has a severe speech disorder and special needs.

The overarching theme lately has been money: I don’t have enough of it. We’re officially living in poverty, my son and I, so when something happens, we can’t pay to fix it. I need a bigger income; I need to be more employable. Rather than continuing to need help over and over again, I went back to college in hope of finally getting my BA, and finding solid work.

tuition

Behold, my tuition bill!

Right now, I’m paying for it myself. I currently owe for one of my Spring classes (I paid for the rest) and one class this Summer. Together, that’s almost $1300. I’ve set the fundraiser for $1500 to cover the fees GoFundMe will charge, and to pay for one textbook this summer.

Paying for school is something I have to do on top of rent and food and basic utilities. It’s a cost above what I have to pay for my medical expenses. With thyroid surgery in two weeks, I don’t see any way to do it all. Plus, if I can’t pay for my classes by May 31, I won’t be able to register for Fall in time to get into classes only availble one time a year. My goal is to graduate with my AA in May 2017, before transferring for my BA, so this should be my one chance at Fall-only classes. I need to get into them.

As a reward, when I’ve met my goal, I’ll release an ebook of five Mythos fiction short stories to all of my backers, no matter how much you contribute. This will include two pieces previously published by Chaosium, that aren’t available anywhere else, and three new stories no one has laid eyes (or tentacles) on. I’m creating original interior art for the project, and the ebook package will include .epub, .mobi (for Kindle), and .PDF. There’s even reward levels if you want to get extra stuff back.

You can contribute because I’m a good person going through a hard time. You can contribute because you like my writing and want to see more of it. You can contribute because you haven’t had to roll a SAN check recently. No matter why you lend a hand, I appreciate you.

Thank you.

Carrie Cuinn

PS. If you’d rather contribute by PayPal, which doesn’t charge quite as much as GoFundMe, you can send money using this link . If you do, I’ll add it manually, so the total amount needed goes down.

#SFWAPro

My work will be included in this year’s Art & Words show

art show

Todd FordRavenous

I’ve been accepted to the annual art and fiction show, curated by Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam and Jennifer Aglio, which is held in Fort Worth, TX, each year. I won’t be able to be there in person, but I’m thrilled to be in the lineup, which includes:

2016 Writers

Katharyn Howd Machan
Shane Halbach
Courtney Marie
Leah Tieger
Joe Milazzo
Shawna Borman
Karen Bovenmyer
Lisa Shininger
Laura Madeline Wiseman
Layla Al-Bedawi
Carrie Cuinn
Matthew Pitt

As well as a dozen visual artists (you can read more about them here).

There are two parts to the show. First, they selected a reprint work of mine – my poem, “Myth of the Mother Snake”, previously published at Liminality Magazine– which an artist will be using as the inspiration to create a new piece of art. Then, I chose from a list of submitted artworks, and I’ll be writing a new flash fiction story to go alone with it. All of the art and words will be on display during the show.

* Note to locals: The Art & Words Show will be on Saturday, October 1, 2016 at Art on the Boulevard if you’d like to attend.

Patreon Update: 5 poems in 5 months, and more

Since starting my Patreon page in November 2015, I have consistently posted new content each month. I work better on a deadline, with structure, and this ongoing project gives me both of those things. To date, I’ve shared:

  1. 5 complete poems
  2. 4 excerpts from short stories in progress
  3. assorted other notes for my patrons

Three of the story excerpts are science fiction (two are definitely “hard sf”; the other is more subtle). One is modern fantasy, bordering on magic realism. All of the excerpts are several paragraphs long.

One poem is about witches, one is about a goddess. Two are science fiction. One has robots, one is set in space. Four have a loose style; one is a sonnet. The sonnet, at 14 lines, is the shortest one.

In all, not bad for 5 months of work.

I’m currently only at the first patron tier – but in another $20 a month, I’ll switch from poetry to posting complete flash fiction each month. Only subscribers to my Patreon get to see this work right now, and the other things I share in addition to the monthly original fiction. If I can get more supporters, to allow me to spend more time creating this work, I’ll keep adding more of the “extra bits”: more notes, and at least one excerpt from a wip each month.

My subscribers are only charged once per month, no matter how much I share, so whatever you commit to is all you’ll have to pay. Since your support gives me an opportunity to make a little extra money while I’m in college, it also frees me up to do a little more work for everyone – like the mini movie reviews I’ve started posting once a week.

So if you can, and you want to see writing from me that’s not yet available anywhere else, please go to my Patreon page and throw a few bucks my way. I appreciate it.

Novel-In-Progress Update:11,333 words

I don’t have as many words on the novel as I was hoping by now; it’s been 3 weeks that I’ve been writing seriously on it, and my goal is 5000 words a week. At this point, I’ve got 18 weeks of writing to go to hit my estimated goal of 100,000 words, which is only an guess until I get closer. I’ll accept anything over 90k, really. That’s not the limit for where it will end up after editing, but I’m hoping to write enough in the first draft that I can cut whatever I need to. (I’ve always been a “write too much, cut down to make better” type of writer, and I’m a little nervous I’ll end up with a novella instead of a novel if I’m not careful.)

The lower word count doesn’t represent the amount of time I’ve spent over the last three weeks, though. The first 5,000 words were down in the first week, but I quickly realized there was more to the story than I’d imagined. Much of my time was spent expanding the outline, and researching, once I figured out the story wanted a different ending, and a couple of extra plot points. That’s not a surprise. This novel is like an origami animal: I can see (in my head) the shape of it, what it is, but I have to unfold it to see all the nooks and crannies.

I know the characters get from A to B to C, and that they change along the way, but I write organically, the way that makes the most sense to me. If I set my story in a real place, and I send a character out in one direction, what will they actually run into? If a kid who’s never been outside has to sleep in a forest, how will they react to rain? Or bugs? Or a sprained ankle? Writing those things out requires knowing the answers.

My research this week has included:

I’m building a Pinterest page for my novel, if you’re interested. This week’s image is the reference I’m using for one of my main characters, Zora:

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Isn’t she lovely? She’s not the MC, but she’s one of the two most important other people in the book (and let me just say right now that I’m not going to allow any editor/publisher to “whiten her up”). She was a minor character when I start drafting the novel, but by really thinking about her motivations and how she’d react to the situation I put her in, I realized I was putting her into a certain trope that a flesh-and-blood woman with the personality I gave her wouldn’t fall into. I like her more, as a person, now.

Stay tuned for more updates!

Mini Review: “The Barkley Marathons” (2015)

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“If you’re selected, you get a letter of condolences: sorry to inform you, you’ve been selected to run the Barkley.” – THE BARKLEY MARATHONS: THE RACE THAT EATS ITS YOUNG

So begins a fascinating documentary on a race you’ve probably never heard of: a trail run so difficult that so far, only 14 people have actually finished it. Over 100 miles, in 5 loops, with 54,200 feet (16,500 m) of accumulated vertical climb, no aid stations, no GPS allowed, and a map you’re only allowed to see before you head out. To prove you ran the route correctly, you have to find paperback books scattered along the trail, and bring back pages that correspond to your race number. The entry fee is $1.60, a license plate from your home state or country, and what the race organizer needs that year: white socks, flannel shirts.

That’s not the weirdest part.

The course changes a little each year, and as one contestant said, to understand the directions you need to know the history of Cantrell’s directions for previous races. More than 30 people have given up before they even reached the end of the first two miles.

Co-Creator Gary Cantrell founded it after hearing about James Earl Ray’s prison break, but not as an homage to Ray; he heard Ray only got 8 miles after being in the woods for 55 hours, and thought he could do better. Each year, dozens of the world’s top ultramarathoners gather to prove themselves better than Ray too – to officially complete the race, all 100+ miles have to be finished in less than 60 hours.

It gets weirder, still.

You have to write an essay to even be considered.

I don’t want to give away all of the movie’s secrets, but it’s certainly worth watching, especially for fans of running, extreme sports, the depths of personal willpower, and anyone who’s ever planning to write a story in which a character has to escape through tough terrain. It made me feel like a slacker for not even trying to add a little running to my regular walking routine, so I’m doing that now – but on the other hand, since I’ve watched it, I feel like a hero whenever I get more than 2 miles.

I at least have the power to do that.

4/5*

Available on Netflix

Mini Review: “Twinsters” (2015)

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What if your identical twin sister sent you a Facebook message, and until then, you hadn’t known she existed? This is the story of two young women who met online. And a story of adoption. And a story of South Korea.

What started out as a cute story told with tweets, Skype, and emoji, turns into the exploration of two girls raised differently but with such complete love that finding another one of them was universally met with joy from their families and friends. I can’t imagine being so loved that if your parents found a second one of you, they would be thrilled, and welcome your twin as a second child, but this movie makes you happy for these adorable women, who literally traveled the world to find each other.

With the joy, comes the bittersweet. Not only do we see the impossible ways these two, raised on different continents, are alike, we also see how they’re not, contrasting the twin with adopted siblings – who grew up gregarious and brave – against the one who grew up feeling isolated, her whole life, even with all the love and opportunity her parents gave her. Her hesitation, her slow blossoming, into someone who maybe, sort of, might be ready to accept she isn’t alone after all.

Finally, South Korea. The movie ends with a chance to go “home” again, and unanswered questions, and the feeling of being a part of something larger than even together they had ever imagined. It’s a perfectly wistful note to close out the film.

Recommended for anyone who wants more empathy, more understanding, of what it’s like to be a sister, an only child, an adoptee, a person of color with white parents, unwanted, adored, lost, and found.

5/5*

Available on  Netflix

Mini Review: “An Honest Liar” (2014)

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This documentary about James Randi – former magician, escape artist, and professional skeptic – makes a big deal out of a small thing, and nearly loses its focus in the process, but is good overall. I’ll get the “shocking” bit out of the way up front: the filmmakers are caught up in presenting Randi’s long-time relationship as if viewers will be aghast at the revelations, oh my! But really, it’s all exposed and resolved in the end, and was nothing as interesting as the bulk of the movie, which focuses on Randi’s life as a magician, and then later as a skeptical con man.

Randi has to be given most of the credit for the film, not just in being an intriguing subject, but the way he presented his whole life, openly, talking about his sexuality, history, beliefs, and tricks. I learned a lot about Randi’s investigations, including things I’d never heard before about his feud with “mentalist” Uri Geller, his investigation into faith healer Peter Popoff, and just how far he went to infiltrate a famous university study of psychic abilities.

This is the perfect sort of movie to watch while multitasking – you don’t need to keep your eyes on the screen every second, but you’ll learn enough to make the time spent worthwhile. Plus, there’s cameos from Alice Cooper, Bill Nye, Adam Savage, Penn Jillette, and many others.

4/5*

Available on Netflix

I’ve updated the big list of Asian Speculative Fiction Authors! Are you on it?

What am I looking for to include you on this list? You must be a published author, publicly marketing yourself as Asian, Asian-American, etc.

The point of the BIG LIST OF ASIAN SPECULATIVE AUTHORS is to promote the reading of authors who don’t always get included in recommendation lists because of subtle or overt racial bias on the part of the people creating those lists. We’ve all seen these big end of year or “best of” lists that are all white, all male, and so on. Sure, most of the time, that bias isn’t intentional. But it’s there, and it sucks.

Authors who don’t appear to be visibly non-white, authors with Anglicized names, authors who don’t allow themselves to be described as non-white, who don’t include that information in their bios – I’m included in that list – we have a certain amount of advantage with readers who prefer to stick with “traditional” (aka, white, American) authors, thinking that we’ll write a certain kind of story they’re familiar with. Sad but true fact: our ability to at least pass as white benefits us with some readers. It’s my hope that by collecting a list like this,  anyone who’s open to reading more broadly, reading outside of their experience, will be able to easily find new authors and new stories to try out.

There’s a fear some readers have that the authors on this list – non-US or non-white authors in general – create work that is “ethnic” or strange. That they won’t understand it because it’s about people and places they don’t know. That hasn’t been my experience. Not only will you find that there are hundreds of fabulous writers, and stories, on this list, but a great many of them are American, Canadian, or British authors… authors whose work is colored not only by their lives as Asians, but as Americans (for example). They write in, and are influenced by, the traditions of science fiction and fantasy that readers of my blog are most familiar with.

There are also authors whose work focuses much more deeply on their homelands, and their experiences as non-white people. There are stories with characters, plots, settings, and even story formats you may not know. Read those! I firmly believe that the more we read, not only are we better writers and readers, because we’ve expanded what we know, but we’re better people, too. The more widely we read, the more we expand ourselves.

I’ve added recent suggestions from the comments/email/Twitter. All authors mentioned prior to 3/17/2016 are now included. If you’re not on this list but should be, or if you’re on it but want me to link to a more recent story or current website, comment below. Really, I want to update this list with accurate information and a link to your favorite work, but you need to give it to me. (Please note that in some cases, I’ve spoken to an author that someone else suggested, and they’ve told me they don’t feel they qualify for this list. If you think I’m missing an obvious choice, check with that author first, and then let me know!)